FAD launches in Malaita to support incomes during COVID-19 restrictions

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This group of Malaita residents is preparing to release a fish-aggregating device (FAD) at Uhu in the West Are’are area of Solomon Islands’ Malaita Province. Another has just been launched at Small Malaita.

The FAD releases are part of a $100,000 provincial government project to support livelihoods during COVID-19 restrictions. Work continues in the small island communities despite the current state of public emergency that is operating in the Solomon Islands capital, Honiara. 

For years, the Malaita Provincial Fishery Office in Auki has supported coastal communities with the deployment of FADs. In May, the fisheries officers put FADs to sea near Kwai and Ngongosila Islands in East Malaita, and Musukwi in North Malaita. It plans to extend the use of FADs to the Malaita Outer Islands soon. 

Photo: Mathew Isihanua.

Ferry route an economic lifeline for Russell Islanders

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Over the years, the Gizo–Honiara ferry has provided an economic lifeline for the fishing community of the Russell Islands. This ship is moored at the wharf at Yandina, in the Russell Islands, to pick up the latest catch. The seafood is packed in ice in chiller boxes and will be sold in the Honiara markets.

The importance of the route has grown because of the on-off operation of the Yandina Fisheries Centre on Russell Islands.

The group of islands is in the Central Islands Province of Solomon Islands, and lies north-west of the national capital, Honiara. Gizo is the capital of Western Province.

The national government, through the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, built fisheries centres around the country in 1984. But many of the centres, including the Yandina one, have often stood idle due to the lack of machinery to keep them running.

To get around this problem and maintain a flow of fish for sale at the Honiara market, fish vendors saw an opportunity to purchase fresh fish from the Russell Islands or tuna from Noro, in Western Province. 

Because the Yandina centre is not running at the moment, the ice has been brought from Honiara. However, this is about to change: an agreement has been signed to repair the Yandina Fisheries Centre and get it running again.

Long hours ahead to unload tons of tuna

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In much of the world it’s Labour Day, and we salute the workers who crew the tuna fishing vessels. These two fishers from a purse-seine crew are standing on between 700 and 1,700 tons of frozen tuna. It might be 35°C up here on deck, but once they are working deep in the hold, the temperature may be as low as –15°C. 

When catches are landed at port or transhipped to a carrier vessel, the crew will work long days on shifts of about 15 hours, with five breaks. Work is suspended if it rains, as the rain damages the tuna – and it gives the crew a welcome break.

In the industrial tuna industry, the issue of working conditions and workers’ rights are complex and it is very difficult to make sure the existing rules and regulations are upheld in a way that is fair for crew. Across the Western and Central Pacific Ocean, FFA members have harmonised the minimum terms and conditions for obtaining fishing licences in FFA waters. These conditions now include labour rights. It’s a step in the right direction.

Photo by Francisco Blaha.

Accuracy and speed needed to prepare tuna for same-day delivery around the world

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The people who cut up tuna at the Marshall Islands Fishing Venture (MIFV) processing facility in Majuro make it look easy – but there’s a lot of skill involved in working so quickly and accurately.

The tuna in this video, yellowfin and bigeye, is destined for tables in the United States, Canada and Japan. The factory is supplied by a fleet of locally based longline fishing boats, and the MIFV workers process the tuna for same-day air delivery via Asia Pacific Airlines (APA) to the overseas markets.

MIFV and APA are subsidiaries of Luen Thai Fishing Venture, which also operates a longline tuna processing operation in Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia. It is similar to the one in Majuro. Luen Thai is one of the largest fishing and seafood companies in the Asia–Pacific region. Its integrated fishing business provides services such as base operations, logistics, and the processing and marketing of tuna and other seafood products to customers in the South Pacific, Japan and other eastern Asian countries, the US, and Europe. 

Video by Hilary Hosia, Marshall Islands Journal

#WCPFC15 POSTCARDS: BACK TO THE BREAD AND BUTTER ISSUES – Eugene Pangelinan, Executive Director, National Oceanic Resources Management Authority, FSM

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This is WCPFC 15, and it’s number 15 for me. That’s the nature of my job, like any other Fisheries manager here. It’s to make sure the decisions of the Commission are balanced and take into account our interests, not only as custodians of the resources but as development partners to this fishery so it’s important the measures here are effective and achieve long term goals. They should also create jobs and livelihoods and food security for our people.

Key highlights over those 15 years from where I sit? The biggest is the in-zone management regime, the Vessel Day Scheme. It’s transformed the fishery and our economic benefits to the Parties to the Nauru Agreement. The regional observer program is another of the key highlights. Those who are in these jobs are the unseen eyes and ears of our fishery in terms of compliance. We have a lot of young, dedicated people who make a lot of sacrifices to go out there and work under often difficult conditions and challenging reporting requirements.

And my third highlight is electronic monitoring. It’s the next stage for improving compliance and transparency, using tech to become more cost-effective, while doing a better job of managing the resources we have. That trend is only to improve as technology adapts and evolves with us.

At these commission meetings, negotiation is a key skill but it actually sits on a base of compromise, understanding and respect. Nothing annoys me more than people listening to us, saying they understand our situation, and then still going on to compare us to other Oceans. This is a totally different Ocean. We are the Western and Central Pacific Ocean, just look at the map. There are 17 member countries and territories. When you look at other Ocean areas, there is nothing there like us. So when people who participate in other Ocean forums come here and anticipate the same setting, it’s not. We are people. We are small Islands. We are affected, and our livelihoods, our futures depend on the health of these resources and the ocean they come from. So yes, at this 15th Commission, an ongoing message to all is that there is a need for mutual respect in this forum.

The measure that most needs to get across the line this week is obviously the Tropical Tuna Measure. It’s the bread and butter of this Commission and is a key objective of what we were established to do.  –ENDS

#WCPFC15 Postcards: BETWEEN OCEAN AND LAND- TUNA’s SEABIRD CONNECTION- Karen Baird, Oceania Regional Coordinator, Birdlife International

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What’s my Tuna Commission why? My passion for maritime advocacy comes from a love for albatrosses and seabirds. I grew up in a country where we have more seabirds than land birds! New Zealand is the seabird capital of the world. Even where I live in the Hauraki Gulf, we’ve got 25 species of seabirds, so spending time at sea, seeing these birds on the water, is just a wonderful experience. They basically live at sea, but of course have to come back to land to breed, so are vulnerable in both realms. We know that seabird populations are still being driven down by fisheries bycatch and one in particular — our Antipodean Albatross, will be extinct in 20 years if we can’t get better protection in this Commission. It’s why Seabirds are on the agenda this year.

This Commission meeting is  my seventh in this role for BirdLife. For somebody coming here for the first time, it might be confusing. There’s a lot happening, there’s all sorts of discussions and lots of side meetings. But it’s actually all about making connections with people.  Although people are here to represent their countries or their NGOs, at the end of the day, they are all just people, and they have the same sorts of ideas, passions, and concerns as everyone else. It’s just about trying to get everyone to agree on how to manage that.

Of all these commission meetings I have attended so far my favourite memory was attending a Commission meeting in the Marshall Islands. We went to a little island with a whole lot of the members, and enjoyed a picnic for the day. It just was a chance to talk to people on a normal, human level, and get to know them personally, to see these fisheries delegates as people first. To be out of a conference room, on the water in the very environment being talked about in the meeting, was just beautiful.//ENDS