Palau says it will continue to address Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing

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Small island nations like Palau are leading the charge in a  raft of regional programs such as addressing one Pacific challenge – Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing. 

Palau President Tommy Remengesau Jr. told reporters in a press conference on December 26 that Palau is one of the strongest advocates of sustainable future in the Pacific.

“More and more we should look at ourselves as a contributing country,” Remengesau said.

He said Palau is working with development partners to ramp up maritime surveillance in the Pacific to combat illegal fishing and other crimes at sea.

Palau, he said, will continue to work with Japan, Australia, United States and neighboring small countries.

Palau will continue to advocate for sustainable fishing as its contribution to being  a part of the eight-member of the Parties of the Nauru Agreement (PNA)  is to put in place policies to discourage over fishing.

“As part of the PNA member countries, we establish conservation area within each jurisdiction, in the mould of similar activities as Protected Areas Network or sanctuaries, to ensure sustainability of the fisheries resources into the future,” President Tommy Remengesau said.

 The PNA controls the world’s largest sustainable tuna purse seine fishery. The PNA members are Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu.

Remengesau said under the PNA arrangement, Palau continue to receive its share of the revenues, despite small fishing activities in its waters.

Palau receives its share under the PNA’s Vessel Day Scheme (VDS). The VDS is a system where fishing effort in days is allocated to the eight members.

Fishing days are sold to fleets at a price of at least $8,000 per fishing day.

Palau has earned over $5 million in 2016 from its VDS revenue while the nation’s VDS revenue from longline fisheries amounted to $475,480 that year.

The President said Palau contributes to the PNA as one of the strongest champions against illegal and unsustainable fishing

 “We don’t want to continue with the unsustainable fishing practice of harvest, harvest and harvest, that’s why there should be an active program to ensure sustainable population of the fish stocks in the Pacific region,” Remengesau said.

He said Palau’s national marine sanctuary law is: “Palau’s contribution to the overall PNA commitment to not only harvest but also conserve the resources.”

In an earlier statement, PNA and the Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) quoted  a report on the impact of IUU fishing prepared for the FFA in 2016. The report estimated the value of catch associated with illegal fishing at over US$600 million annually, with the direct economic loss to FFA members of around US$150 million

In 2015, Palau led with signing into law a legislation declaring 80 percent of its waters as  a marine sanctuary, where no commercial fishing will take place.

Palau is also set to become the first country in the world to ban certain reef-toxic sunscreen and the first country to introduce a passport pledge to require tourists to protect its environment. 

Labour standards push hopes for thumbs up from Tuna Commission

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Building on the success of their support for Observer safety at the 2016 Pacific Tuna Commission session in Nadi, Forum Fisheries countries are gunning for the 15th session in Honolulu this week to pass a resolution aimed at ending any cruel and unfair treatment of crew members on fishing vessels.

The non-binding resolution on Labour standards for crew comes as an increasing number of reported incidents are being heard, some of them involving Pacific nationals working on vessels in Pacific waters.

Vanuatu’s head of Fisheries Kalo Pakoa says its a national priority from where he sits, because government is keen to encourage more ni-Vanuatu to take up jobs in the sector– which has seen spikes and dips in recruitment.

“The crewing sector’s had a long history in Vanuatu since the 60’s and has employed more than a thousand workers at its heights….but seen declines as well,” he says. “We are working to rebuild the sector and develop our human resource capacity through training, and pushing for good registration and crew records of our crew on our fleets as well as other fleets in our waters”

The resolution builds on commitments in global workers rights conventions of the ILO, and the WCPFC’s founding convention. Another attraction for getting it passed is the credibility for those championing it, but Vanuatu’s government are already planning to walk the talk on the issue.

“It’s important — we have issues within our fleet with regards to human rights, welfare issues and capacity, so government has actually tasked us to come up with standards and legislation, and in future the Fisheries Department will be shouldering this responsibility, away from the current Labour Department jurisdiction,” says Pakoa.

“It’s necessary and important for us to not only focus on the other groups of people working on the value chain of the fishery, but to also look at the standard of workers, the people who are the first in line to see the fish that comes out of the ocean– so we think their welfare is also very important in this process. From the side of the FFA members, its an economic and employment opportunity aiming to improve capacity and standards of workers.”

Pakoa is chairing working-groups on the proposed resolution text which is already undergoing changes, and is likely to face more tweaking before it goes to a final plenary of the Commission late Friday in Honolulu. 

Is the resolution still ‘live’ in terms of getting all the WCPFC members on board with the Pacific call? Pakoa is positive. 

“So far it’s not a no, it’s a yes in principle –but there is work to be done to improve the text of the resolution, so there’s progress here tonight, and there’s progress in getting input of all the Commission country members into a document we will get to the Chair between now and Friday.”

He says the tweaking of the text of the resolution will ensure it aligns with national level legislation or conventions of members in their own jurisdictions, and is all part of the process. //ENDS

Pacific nations warned of threat to sovereignty from Distant Water Fishing Nations

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HONOLULU, 13 DECEMBER 2018 (PACNEWS)—- Papua New Guinea’s Fisheries Industry Association has warned delegates at the Tuna Commission to ensure their national interests are protected from the threat posed by Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFNs) wanting to extend the jurisdiction of fishing rules.

Chairman Sylvester Pokajam said members of the Western and Central Fisheries Commission must fight for their rights.

“The biggest threat that I keep telling the members of the PNA and the FFA they (DWFNs) have now encroached into managing our exclusive economic zones and they try to also exercise the mandate of the commission into our internal archipelago waters.

“And we said no, that is non-negotiable and it’s going to remain non-negotiable because that’s our territory, so our members should not lose sight of that.

Pokajam said the WCPFC was formed to manage the high seas but external fisheries interests had encroached into management of the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) of some Pacific nations.

“That’s why they should remain alert to make sure that we remain dominant because the moment they have more numbers in the commission, they may exercise their right to vote we would lose our rights and I don’t think we’d allow that.

At the moment Pacific Island nations make up a slim majority of members of the WCPFC but with other countries interested in joining that advantage could be eroded. While decisions within the WCPFC are usually taken by consensus a vote can be called as a last resort

Pokajam said it is important Pacific nations audit co-operating non-members carefully, to ensure that they are in compliance with commission regulations.

“I don’t think we should allow many (to join),” he said

Pokajam explained that members must ensure the interests of coastal states are protected.

“So (the) main objective of the coastal states – mostly the FFA members – is that we make sure that our interest is protected at all times, at all costs and at the same time the way we are seeing now is that DWFN are trying to take the power away from us,” Pokajam said.

“They (have tried) as much as possible since day one to take that power away from the coastal states but for FFA member countries we will fight for it and I think we have been very successful to date. “

Pokajam said the Pacific always remains united and nations had made some sacrifices for the sake of solidarity.

“We have been able to force our message through the purse seine industry, through the FFA and come up with our own measures through the three implementing arrangements to 100 percent observer coverage, High Seas closure – these are measures we put in place,” he said.

The VDS scheme- in which licensees pay a daily fee to operate in fishing zones – is the single most successful resource management model using rights-based control over fisheries resources.

“We have implemented the VDS. Purse seine, effect control, used to be by number of boats, that’s not the case since 2004. Effort has now shifted to days. What we are saying is you can have so many number of boats but you are limited to days,” Pokajam told journalists in Honolulu.

“And to our surprise a decade ago the value of the fisheries was about US$60 million now its more than US$400million. That’s the case because we exercise our rights and our sovereignty over the EEZ.

“The biggest threat that I can see is that they take away our rights to manage and to do whatever we want to do in our own National laws and at the same time through sub-regional and regional arrangements like the FFA, PNA and the Pacific Forum leaders.”

On Bigeye tuna, Pokajam said the Pacific must oppose US efforts to increase catch limits, saying the proposal did nothing to improve sustainable fishing.

Distant-water nations in Europe, China, the United States, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan have traditionally been reluctant to curb their tuna catches.

“It’s just because they see the green in all our fishery at the moment, Big Eye, Yellowfin, Skipjack, Pacific Albacore are all now in green,”Pokajam said.

“Our stock assessment is telling us that all our stocks are in green, safe zone. Just because we attain that good management and they try to come in to ride on it and I don’t I think we should agree with that.

“I think FFA member countries should reject that. I’m not part of the group that discuss this – I think I’ll leave it to them but I think we should not support that,” he said… PACNEWS

Japan does not support US big-eye proposal at Tuna Commission

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Japan believes that the US proposal to increase its bigeye catch limit is not fair.

The proposal would reward countries for better than minimum observer coverage on their longline vessels and for banning transshipment of fish. Transshipment is well-known as a key risk area for misreporting on fish catches and for potentially other illicit activities such as trafficking people or drugs.

FFA Members including Tonga have expressed strong concerns regarding the US proposal.

Head of Japan’s delegation to the Tuna Commission in Honolulu Mr Shingo Ota told Pacific Editors Japan does not like the US proposal as there are many other factors to be taken into account.

In the case of Japan, he said, they have been providing catch support which is a fundamental basis of stock assessment, therefore this scientific contribution should be appreciated.

The view from Japan is US is picking up only limited factors which are in favour of their operations and it is unfair. The United States has acknowledged it will be the only country eligible to benefit.

Ota also denied suggestions made in the US proposal that observer coverage on the Japanese fleet has gone down in the past year. He said the US figures are misleading and wrong. Ota emphasised that Japan is actually implementing its requirement for a minimum of 5% coverage.

He said while some of the fleets had little bit less than 5%, others had more than 5%.

On observers, Japan said it had had some unfortunate incidents in the past. Sometimes observers get depressed and they really want to return to port. Therefore, the fishing vessel had to quit fishing operations. Ota said Japan is working on this issue and that’s why electronic monitoring would be one of the solutions.

Pacific countries have proposed that this year’s Tuna Commission pass a resolution in supporting better working conditions for crew and observers working in the tuna fleets of all member countries.

Ina letter to the Commission the FFA Chair, Tepaeru Herrmann said: “The issue of poor labour conditions and mistreatment of workers on fishing vessels is vitally important, both to the Pacific and across the globe. Not only is the reputation of the WCPO fishery threatened by this, but our own citizens are at risk of being subjected to deplorable working conditions,”.

Ota said while Japan was very much supportive of the idea it the questioned if the Tuna Commission is best placed to handle this issue.

“The International Labor Organisation has a convention which deals with exactly the same topic so I think it would be natural to ask the members to ratify the Convention rather than discussing this issue at WCPFC,” Ota said

Japan fears the resolution, which is non-binding, might lead on to a push for binding labour standards.

It is easier to accept if it is a non-binding resolution, but what comes next is the question,”  Ota said. ……ENDS

Japan seeks to continue fishing in Palau waters

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Japan stressed the importance of its relationship with the Pacific, with most of the big scale fishing by the Japanese being centered in Pacific nations’ water.

Head of Delegation for Japan Shingo Ota, speaking at the Tuna Commission meeting in Honolulu said they were concerned about 20 small-scale longliners from Okinawa prefecture operating in Palau’s exclusive economic zone.

Mr Ota said those boats fear losing their livelihood once the island nation transition’s 80 percent of its waters to a no-fishing zone.

He said Japan is currently in talks with Palau to allow Okinawa fishermen to continue to fish in Palau after 2020 or the implementation of the Palau Marine Sanctuary.

“We are very much concerned because this is the main fishing ground for those 20 small-scale longliners. If Palau is going to close the area those vessels have nowhere to go,” Ota said.

He said Japan is requesting Palau to find a way, maybe through research, to allow the fishermen from Okinawa to continue fishing.

Ota, however, declined to give further details on the request.

Japan is one of Palau’s top foreign donors and the aid provided by Tokyo has helped the island nation to build roads and infrastructure.

By 2020, Palau is set to designate 80 percent of the nation’s maritime territory as a fully protected marine reserve in which no fishing or mining, can take place. 

Twenty percent of Palau’s waters will become a domestic fishing zone reserved for local fishermen and small-scale commercial fisheries with limited exports.

The marine sanctuary is President Tommy Remenegsau’s signature policy saying, Palau wants to lead the way in restoring the health of the ocean for future generations.

Japan speaks out on ‘unfair’ US proposal

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Japan said that the United States proposal to that the Tuna Commission increase its catch-quota on for bigeye tuna is “unfair,”

“I think the US is picking up only limited factors which are in favour of their operations. So, I think it is unfair,” the Head of Delegation for Japan Shingo Ota told reporters at the Tuna Commission meeting.

Pacific nations and other members of the WCPFC are locked in tense discussions over the future of the tropical tuna fishery which includes bigeye tuna as well as skipjack and yellowfin.

WCPFC’s current members are Japan, Australia, China, Canada, Cook Islands, the European Community, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, Japan, Kiribati,Korea, the Republic of Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Chinese Taipei (Taiwan), Tonga, Tuvalu, the United States of America, and Vanuatu.

Ota was quick to criticise the US proposal, joining other Pacific nations in resisting any increase in the quota: “We don’t like it. 

“Their proposal is if a country has better observer coverage and does not conduct transshipment they can receive more allocation,” Ota said.

The US is seeking a higher catch limit for bigeye tuna by its Hawaii-based longline fishing fleet.

In its proposal, Washington highlights the significant levels of monitoring and control it maintains in the fishery, outperforming other members of the Commission.

The US points out that while large longline fleets are maintained by Japan, Korea and Taiwan have failed to meet the Commission’s minimum requirement of placing independent fisheries observers on 5 per cent of their vessels the Hawaii-based US fleet does better.

 Figures included in the proposal show the US fleet has achieved observer coverage of about 20 per cent in its deep-set fishery and 100% in its shallow-set fishery.

But Japan said the figures cited in the U.S proposal that suggest observer coverage on the Japanese fleet has gone down in the past year are “misleading.”

“Actually, the U.S figures are not correct and we are actually implementing 5% coverage. In some of the fleets a little bit less than 5% but some of the fleets are more than 5%,” Ota stated. 

FSM taps into technology for full tuna transparency

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The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is tapping into the latest high-tech surveillance technology to be its eyes on the vessels to monitor fishing activities in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ) embarking on a commitment to Technology in Tuna Transparency Challenge.

Eugene Pangelinan Executive Director of the FSM National Oceanic Resource Management Authority (NORMA), said FSM is making use of emerging technologies to further improve national fisheries administrations, “to ensure that fish can be verified for traceability and transparency.”

Pangelinan, on the sidelines of the ongoing Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC), said the goal is to use a variety of technology so that that they can collect detailed data on fishing effort, target catch composition, and bycatch of non-target species that come in on the vessels in FSM. 

Electronic Monitoring systems in fisheries use video cameras, remote sensors, satellites, and hard drives installed on fishing boats to provide a range of information, including information on retained and discarded catch. The data is provided to shore-based teams of analysts.

In tuna fisheries, gathering information in this way is particularly important in the longline fisheries where the very large number of smaller vessels makes it challenging to achieve the 5% percent target coverage by on board fisheries observers.

Pangelinan said the data it will ensure that “tuna caught in FSM was harvested legally, sustainably and without slave labor.”

FSM President Peter Christian at the Our Oceans Conference in Bali, Indonesia in October vowed to have all fleets active in its waters comply with full transparency by 2023.

Christian challenged other nations to do the same, commit to full tuna transparency by 2023 in what is known at the T-3 Challenge or Technology for Tuna Transparency Challenge.

 “By taking this lead, the FSM are committed to full tuna transparency that we hope will promote a worldwide shift in fishing practices and set the stage for global seafood market transformation for the betterment of us, and our oceans,” Pangelinan said.

 To kick start the initiative, Pangelinan said the Nature Conservancy have announced a $2.5M funding goal to support the T-3 Challenge.

Pangelinan stressed the technology is not aimed at replacing human observers but rather enhancing the compliance monitoring system. Observers provide a different kind of information and are important in ground-truthing information gained through electronic monitoring.

Pangelinan said the shore-based analysis centers will provide jobs for Pacific Islanders with observer experience.

He said FSM is falling behind WCPFC requirements of five percent coverage because of the logistical issues about placing these independent observers on long liners when they traverse the Pacific for long months and often do not return to the port from where they started their trip.  

FSM is hoping that Parties of the Nauru Agreement (PNA) and Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) and WCPFC will partner with them to achieve the Tuna Transparency challenge by 2023.  

“I think we will achieve it, but it’s just that it would be very helpful and strengthen and support us for others to have the same commitment,” Pangelinan said.

PNA officials recently considered the development of a PNA E-Monitoring Program at a workshop in Honiara. 

According to an earlier statement, PNA said the workshop was a response to both the decision of PNA Ministers to put a priority on developing a PNA E-Monitoring Program, and President Christian’s call for 100 percent coverage of longline fishing vessels by electronic monitoring by 2023.  

In FSM, revenues from fisheries account for 70 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which translates to about $50 to $60 million a year.

Fiji steps up pressure for adopting target reference point for South Pacific albacore

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HONOLULU, 14 DECEMBER 2018 (PACNEWS)—-Fiji is the latest country to push the  Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) to adopt a target reference point for South Pacific Albacore before the meeting wraps up this week.

The 17 members of the Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) are advocating strongly for strengthened Conservation and Management Measures (CMM’s) and also pushing to advance several priority issues including the Tropical Tuna Measure and adoption of a Target Reference Point (TRP) for the South Pacific Albacore tuna stock.

For the past three years this matter has been deferred under pressure from Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFNs) interests in the southern longline fishery.

Fiji’s delegate Meli Raicebe reminded the Commission that WCPFC has on its books a binding decision to adopt a target reference point for South Pacific Albacore this year.

 “Every year we give a lengthy explanation of our TRP proposal, trying to anticipate and answer all the questions that we know will be asked. And for every question we answer, a new question is raised. Usually a question that we answered the previous year.

“This year we would like to ask a question of other CCMs (member nations). The question is: what do you expect will be the likely result of taking no effective management action and the impact this will have on South Pacific small island developing states? I think you already know the answer and we are simply not prepared to see this happen. I don’t need to go into detail on the FFA proposal – it has been in front of the Commission for three years now,” Raicebe stressed.

He said FFA members are determined that WCPFC needs to follow through on this to help bring the fishery back into economic health.

“Enough to say that is based on the best scientific advice and seeks to start this Commission on the path towards effectively managing this stock in a way that will provide economic benefits to all participants in this fishery.

We thank those CCMs that have already engaged with us on our proposal and we look forward to the cooperation of all WCPFC members to ensure it is passed this year,” Raicebe emphasised.

Fiji is the latest country in the region to seek concrete action taken for the adoption of the Target Reference Point.

FFA Director General Dr Manu Tupou Roosen said they are keen to see progress on rules governing the albacore tuna fishery.

“So, it is critical that as a start,as a first step that we adopt this target reference point. And it is just a first step on a long journey that we will have with our partners, our fishing partners, to develop a harvest strategy around that fishery.

“With the albacore fishery, what we are looking for with the adoption of that Target reference point, is to get to a point where we can be economically viable, despite the high operating costs or the low fish prices.  But even in those low troughs, or low peaks that we are able still able to make a profit. And we see as a critical starting point, the adoption of a target reference point, which is why it is a high priority going into this meeting,” Dr Tupou Roosen said…..PACNEWS

Samoa wants tropical tuna measure to remain, and action on climate change

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HONOLULU, 13 DECEMBER 2018 (PACNEWS)—- Any revision of the Tropical Tuna measure by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) will not be supported by Samoa.

FisheriesMinister Lopaoo Natanielu Mua told delegates at this week’s 15th WCPFC meeting this is one key area that is critically important to Samoa and also of importance to other Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

“We are not comfortable with any revision of the tropical tuna measure that will tend to limit the opportunity for a small island developing States to participate in high-seas fishing until such time as high seas limits and a fair price for allocating that limit has been agreed to by the Commission.”

Mua is also keen to see action on albacore tuna which are mainly found in more temperate waters.

“The South Pacific albacore tuna is very important to Samoa as it is the target species for our domestic longline fishery which had been one of the main foreign revenue earners for our economy as well as supporting food security and livelihoods for our people. The inability of the commission to agree to a Target Reference point for the South Pacific albacore will further delay implementation of desired management Interventions, while our domestic fleet is experiencing poor conditions and prolonged reduction in catches.”

“I am also aware of the uneven playing field due to the subsidy support received by some fleets and therefore an appropriate management strategy should be in place to ensure domestic an unsubsidised fleet remain economically viable,” said Mua.

He has also asked the Tuna Commission to urgently develop an agreed robust management arrangement for South Pacific albacore.

“I respectfully ask the Commission members, particularly our fishing partners interested in the South Pacific albacore, to urgently develop an agreed robust management arrangement for South Pacific albacore including progressing with and agreement on the various elements of a harvest strategy, such as the interim target reference point to reverse the decline in biomass trends we have observed of overtime and to restore profitable levels to the fishery.”

Mua explained Samoa is very disadvantaged in terms of its EEZ-size due to its geographic location and being sealocked by EEZs of other Pacific Island States.

“This situation has limited our ability to realise our fishing interest and development aspirations especially opportunities for our domestic fleet operations to be profitable as well as minimising the potential undesirable impacts of commercial operations on our small external fishery.”

“We are considering exploring development opportunities that take place in the closest high seas and your serious consideration of our situation would be much appreciated,” Mua emphasised at the meeting.

As Small island developing States, Mua said the Pacific is facing greater challenges from collapsing fisheries due to increasing level of fishing including IUU, environmental impacts and climate change.

“These challenges threaten the Integrity of our oceans and marine ecosystems and importantly our survival if we are not careful. On that regard we should be mindful that the burden actions to protect our oceans and manage our fisheries resources should not disproportionately fall on our small island developing states.”

“Our resource-constrained Islands, living and non-living resources in our oceans,and beyond high seas, present an exciting prospect in expanding our limited resource base. For instance, tuna and other highly migratory species are critically important as it provides the means for food security, livelihood and economic prosperity for Samoa as a Small Island Developing State.

“It is also important to note that over the past few the decisions, outcomes and inaction by the Commission on addressing key issues pertaining to the management of important tuna stocks have significantly impacted on realising social and economic benefits for some if not all Small Island Developing States, including Samoa,” he said. ……PACNEWS

Kiribati – the Pacific’s biggest tuna nation – backs FFA calls in tough tuna talks

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HONOLULU, 12 DECEMBER 2018 (PACNEWS)—

Kiribati Fisheries Minister Tetabo Nakara has called on nations involved in the Western and Central Pacific fishery to overcome their differences and use science-based innovative solutions to ensure a sustainable Pacific fishery for future generations.

With a catch of around 700,000 tonnes a year, more tuna is caught in Kiribati’s waters than in the waters of any other nation on earth.

In his opening address to the 15thWestern and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in Honolulu, Mr Nakara supported the positions put forward by the Forum Fisheries Agency and the Parties to the Nauru Agreement and challenged distant water fishing nations and coastal states alike to ‘ensure that no one is made worse off from our collective decisions’.

“It is not easy to get everyone on board but as the youngest of all RFMOs (Regional Fisheries Management Organisations) responsible for the world’s greatest tuna resource, I am hopeful and confident that there is good opportunity for needed improvement with informed science-based management decisions at this forum,” Nakara said

Kiribati’s called on members of the WCPFC to set harvest control rules with well-defined target reference points for each tuna species and to adopt a new measure on the Compliance Monitoring System which is effective, efficient and fair.

Fisheries Minister Tetabo Nakara said it’s in their collective interests in search for best and innovative solutions on tuna species.

The challenge is real and similar to that faced in global environmental and climate change forums Mr Nakara said

“It is the collective call on us all as political leaders, scientists, industries, NGOs and our hard-working officials to continue our dialogue in search for best and innovative solutions that will ensure our common call for tuna resources that have brought us all to this important gathering are conserved and sustained sustainably managed,” he said.

“We cannot deny that all we have our own and different issues and that is the reality.

But I urge the secretariat to continue to seek ways forward and solutions for members’ common long-term interests,” said Nakara.

He said they have made some good progress in adopting several necessary conservation and management measures for tropical tuna not only in the exclusive economic zones but also in the high seas.

 The recognition and adoption of arrangements that include FAD (Fish Aggregating Device) closures at the WCPFC level is further evidence of collective achievement, and in particular appreciation of the coastal states aspirations, he said.

“I believe these are some of the factors that have contributed positively to the improvement in stock status particularly for bigeye and yellowfin tuna.

Other priorities for Kiribati include the development and establishment of harvest control rules with well-defined Target Reference Points.

These Nakara noted have “proven politically difficult and sensitive and we all know and understand why this is difficult”.

The Kiribati Fisheries Minister also said their experience with the Compliance Monitoring Scheme (CMS) that has been in place for the last eight years requires systematic improvements so that it facilitates achievement for its intention.

“My delegation is of the belief that the new proposed measure by FFA members is rebuilt on the principle of fairness, effectiveness and efficiency.

It is for that reason, the Minister encouraged member nations to adopting the new measure proposed at this meeting to ensure the Commission has in place a sound basis to accomplish compliance.

“I note that there are agenda items that may polarise our collective approach and when those agenda items are considered I would mutually call on us all to put aside our differences and to humbly approach those issues as one group in one voice with one amicable solution agreeable to us all.

Let all aim to ensure that no one is made worse off from our collective decision,” Nakara told WCPF delegates.

Nakara reminded delegates that at last year’s WCPFC the Chair challenged commission members with a rare opportunity to come up with a legacy that all future generations would remember this generation for.

“To my delegation that legacy is ensuring our future generation access the same or higher level of benefits from our common tuna resources,” he said.

The WCPFC meeting ends on Friday……PACNEWS