Micronesian leaders unite to combat IUU fishing by 2023

Categories NewsPosted on

Micronesian nations are uniting to combat illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing (IUU) by 2023 in the Pacific.

At the 19th Micronesia Presidents’ Summit on 21 February, Palau, Kiribati, the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) and Nauru signed a communique supporting a IUU Free Pacific by 2023. This challenge was set up by the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI).

“It is important to build on the momentum we have at the national and regional level to combat IUU and to give it a goal or a target if you will. Imagine an IUU Free Pacific by 2023,” RMI President Hilda Heine said during the summit in Palau.

“The Marshall Islands seeks your endorsement of this vision and goal, to have Micronesian Leaders support an IUU FREE Pacific by 2023 as an outcome of this important meeting.”

In October at the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission’s Technical and Compliance Committee meeting in Majuro, Marshall Islands President Heine called on Pacific nations to agree to get rid of IUU fishing by 2023.

She urged the leaders of the Micronesian countries to make the same commitments to join the fight against IUU.

Palau President Tommy Remengesau Jr. said the Micronesian region might be small but it comprises large ocean states which makes it all the more important to band together to deal with environmental degradation, including illegal fishing.

“My friends, I like to refer to our nations as the Large Ocean States. With this title comes great responsibility. Not only must we exploit our marine resources for the benefit of our people, we must protect them for our children and for the world at large,” Remengesau said when he welcomed the leaders in the February Summit.

“We must, therefore, continue to lead the world in creative responses to the environmental degradation that faces our Pacific Ocean through pollution, climate change, over-fishing, illegal fishing and the like. Together we must move forward with initiatives that prevent IUU fishing, that expand our protected areas and places limitations on pollution at every level.”

The Forum Fisheries Agency, in 2016, estimated fish either harvested or transshipped illegally in the Pacific region to be in the order of $600 million with the actual economic loss to FFA Members being around $150 million annually.

Heine, the RMI President, said IUU brings a broader scale of challenges that includes transnational crime, human rights and labour standards, pollution, and marine debris.

In the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) meeting in Hawaii last year, the resolution on fishing vessel crew labour standards was adopted.

Led by Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) members, with the support of members of the Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA), the resolution is in line with the goal of FFA members to enhance economic benefits to Small Island Developing States (SIDS) from employment on board fishing vessels licensed to fish in the exclusive economic zones of FFA members.

Heine said the RMI is working closely with the FFA Secretariat in convening an IUU Colloquium in Majuro before the end of the year.

“The target audience will include National Compliance Officers, to our Fishing partners, both flag states and distant water fishing operators,” said Heine.

She added that with development partners, RMI continues to tap into emerging technology to meet the challenges such as the Persons of Interest project to ensure that “we are not so vessel focused in the way we combat IUU fishing; that we are not just collecting information on vessels’ compliance history but more importantly, we’re also collecting information on persons involved in illegal fishing and sharing this information.”

FFA Embraces the Call to Action for A “Balance for Better” World

Categories News, Press ReleasesPosted on

Republished from Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA)

HONIARA, 8 March 2019 – As we celebrate International Women’s Day, we recognise that the theme “Balance for Better” – a call to action for driving gender balance across the world – resonates with our own FFA vision.

“Our own FFA vision to cooperate to maximise benefits for our people through the sustainable use of our offshore resources is fully aligned with this theme. Sustainable management and development will not be successful unless we bring all of our people with us – men and women – on an equal footing,” said FFA Director General, Dr Manu Tupou-Roosen.

In this our 40th Anniversary year, we take this timely opportunity to underline the FFA’s commitment to working actively alongside our member governments to further promote four critical objectives:

* To remove barriers, both formal and informal, that impede or deter the full participation of women within the offshore fisheries sector;

* To address the scourge of domestic violence and provide the practical support to do so;

* To work with all of our partners, including in the private sector, to promote greater gender balance and a respect for diversity that must underpin all our work;

* To acknowledge and celebrate the success and achievement of women in the sector.

In 2016, our Forum Fisheries Committee Ministerial meeting adopted the FFA Gender Equity Policy to guide all our work. To give a practical focus to this, the FFA Secretariat launched our Domestic and Family Violence Policy, which offers practical support to any staff member suffering from domestic violence. We recognise that no workplace is immune from these challenges, hence the importance of offering a compassionate and supportive environment for those affected.

Dr Tupou-Roosen said “On this special day we also acknowledge and celebrate the many thousands of women who are actively engaged in our offshore fisheries sector. These range from those employed in the processing and commercial sectors to those working as team leaders in their areas of expertise and in senior leadership roles.”

“Women are spearheading new pathways in what were once non-traditional areas of work including engineering, surveillance, ports, environment, fisheries observers and advocacy. Without a doubt, this success story will continue.”

Over the coming year and beyond, the FFA Secretariat will continue to work closely with our Members and partners to make this theme a reality in our sector.

Further information and photos contact: Donna Hoerder, FFA Media

ph: +677 773309, donna.hoerder@ffa.int

About Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA)

FFA assists its 17-member countries to sustainably manage fishery resources that fall within their 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). FFA provides expertise, technical assistance and other support to its members who make sovereign decisions about their tuna resources and participate in regional decision making on tuna management. Follow us on Facebook | on Twitter #Ourfishourfuture #tuna #forumfisheries #fisheries2019 #ourmoanaourfish #FFA40th

Samoa and FFA sign agreement on Regional Aerial Surveillance Program

Categories News, Press ReleasesPosted on

Republished from Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA)

APIA, 28 February 2019 – The Prime Minister of Samoa, Hon. Tuilaepa Aiono Sailele Malielegaoi and FFA Director General, Dr Manu Tupou-Roosen signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to formalise Samoa’s support for the FFA’s Regional Aerial Surveillance Program.

The Regional Aerial Surveillance initiative is funded by Australia as part of the Pacific Maritime Security Program to enhance the surveillance capacity of Pacific Island countries to deter, detect and respond to illegal or security-related activities occurring in their Exclusive Economic Zones.

Under the MoU, Samoa will host one and Vanuatu the other, of two King Air200 aircrafts fitted with high-tech sensors, avionics and communications technologies, capable of detecting fishing vessels over a wide area of ocean. Dr Tupou-Roosen said the MoU with Samoa was another significant step forward.

“I wish to acknowledge the generous support of the Government of Australia to strengthen the surveillance capabilities of participating Members through the Pacific Maritime Security Program. This will enable the FFA to assist Pacific islands countries in further addressing maritime surveillance needs and enforcement operations,” said Hon. Tuilaepa Malielegaoi.

“The surveillance programme, in conjunction with the Pacific Patrol Boat program, will provide targeted maritime patrolling and enhance the ability of Pacific island countries to defend against regional maritime security threats such as illegal fishing and transnational crime,” he added.

“The Marshall Islands signed a similar agreement earlier this month and now Samoa is also demonstrating leadership with its willingness to host one of the King Aircraft. Our Members are contributing to a new level of regional cooperation, with Australia funding the Program and the FFA Secretariat managing the planes and working in close consultation with Members,” said FFA DG, Dr. Tupou-Roosen.

The Regional Aerial Surveillance Program commenced in December 2017. Two King Air aircrafts will provide 1400 hours of aerial surveillance per year for 15 FFA Members.

The Regional Surveillance Programme provides targeted maritime patrolling
Image: FFA

For further information contact:

Donna Hoerder, FFA Media, donna.hoerder@ffa.int, ph: +677 7733097

About Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA)

FFA assists its 17-member countries to sustainably manage fishery resources that fall within their 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). FFA provides expertise, technical assistance and other support to its members who make sovereign decisions about their tuna resources and participate in regional decision making on tuna management.

Follow us on Facebook | on Twitter #Ourfishourfuture #tuna #forumfisheries #fisheries2019 #ourmoanaourfish #FFA40th

About Samoa Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT)

The Ministry is responsible for the administration of Government’s business with foreign countries and their governments as well as international organizations. It also endeavours to initiate and continue to provide high quality and professional policy advice to Government on the management of Samoa’s foreign and trade relations. The Ministry is committed to promoting Samoa’s national interests to achieve most benefits in relation to political, trade and economic and security 

The Marshall Islands and Thailand establish cooperation and exchange of information to prevent IUU fishing practices

Categories News, NewsPosted on

Republished from Francisco Blaha’s Blog FEBRUARY 23, 2019

I have been at the 6th Global Fisheries Enforcement Training Workshop (GFETW) here in Bangkok since the 18 Feb. As we ( the Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority MIMRA) have been invited to present what we are doing in terms of our Port State Measures (PSM) system to authorise transhipments.

I say “we” because there are 4 of us; Sam Lawni (Deputy Director), Laurence Edwards (Legal Counsel) and Beau Bigler (Fishery Officer) and myself as an Offshore Fisheries Advisor. I was quite keen for all of us to come to this GFETW as conference only happens every two or three years. It was organised by the International Fisheries Monitoring Control and Surveillance (MCS) Network to improve and enhance the capacity and communications of MCS practitioners around the world. The fact that we are in Bangkok made it more special.

While a lot of effort has been focused on the control of transhipments at sea, transhipments from fishing vessels to refrigerated carriers in port are a vital element in the Pacific tuna fishery and a daily occurrence for us. Thailand is the biggest tuna processing country in the world, and I’d say that half of the transhipments we authorise in Majuro will be arriving here to be processed; we call it the “tuna highway”.

From the “transhipment port” perspective, PSM best practices require the port to take a series of steps prior to authorising port use for transhipment, including: a standardised and integrated process of advance notice and arrival fishing vessel intelligence-based risk analysis using available remote sensing capacities, a transhipment authorization protocol, the estimation of volumes transhipped, and the departure clearance of the carriers with full traceability of fish on board and hatch plan totals.

From the receiving port perspective, as is the case in Bangkok, it must be considered that the fish on board the carriers have “not been previously landed”. Thailand’s Department of Fisheries (DoF) under the Agreement on Port State Measures (PSMA) principles has to evaluate compliance on the legality of the catches of each of the fishing vessels being transported on the carrier, plus the volumes on departure from the last transhipment port. This is to assess the possibility that the carrier would have received fish on board since the last declared port departure. As in many other cases worldwide, the processing states do not have access to all the compliance tools used by the flag states of the fishing vessels, and perhaps most importantly the coastal states where those catches were taken. Having a direct link of collaboration with the regional port states where those vessels transhipped initially facilitate the fulfilment of their obligations under PSMA.

On the other side, only on receiving the fish at the processing plants in Thailand are the verified weights per species per vessels known. Before this, volumes and species composition are based on estimates from the logsheets and observers/monitors estimations. In fact, a 2017 FFA study on the quantification of IUU for the region identified underreporting of catches as the region’s biggest threat in terms of IUU. Yet Thailand’s DoF as part of their e-Traceability program collects all the “weigh in” values of the fish originating on each fishing vessels inside every arriving carrier. This verified information available in Thailand is vital to further understanding the magnitude of the underreporting problem in the Pacific.

6th Global Fisheries Enforcement Training Workshop (GFETW), Bangkok. Image: Francisco Blaha

Based on the understanding of this reality, the Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority (MIMRA), as the fisheries body of the most important transhipment port in the Pacific (>400 a year), approached Thailand’s Department of Fisheries to establish an MoU for cooperation and exchange of information of common interest and mutual benefit.

The MoU, signed on 22 February, is the result of over a year-long engagement I have been fostering between these 2 countries I work substantially with. Both sides identified that reciprocal exchange of fisheries data was an area of critical importance that would require mutual collaboration between key players. In this case, the Marshall Islands (Majuro) being arguably the busiest transhipment port in the world and Thailand (Bangkok) as the largest tuna processing and port State.

With the signing of the MoU, the Marshall Islands, through MIMRA, will now be able to receive verified weights of tuna catches that are transshipped in Majuro and offloaded in Bangkok from Thai fisheries inspection officers on a regular basis.

In essence, this will enable officers on both sides to trace the catch both ways to ensure its legality throughout the entire chain of custody, thereby preventing illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing practices. This verified information is vital to further understand the magnitude of the catch underreporting problem in the region.

The MoU is in line with the Marshall Islands IUU-Free Pacific initiative as declared by H.E. Madam President Dr. Hilda C. Heine last year. Having this direct link of collaboration with a key player like Thailand further facilitates the fulfilment of obligations under the FAO Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), which the Marshall Islands, through MIMRA, is currently considering signing and ratifying in the near future.

At a personal level it has been a huge 10 days as I facilitated a workshop for PEW and WWF full of people I admire, then presented at global fisheries MCS workshop on what are we doing in the Marshall Islands , and realise that I’m a consultant to both the gold (Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency) and silver (ThaiDoF/OceanMind) winners of the stop IUU awards! and then facilitating the Marshalls-Thailand MoU.

PRESS RELEASE: Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority Signs Fisheries Collaboration MoU with Thailand’s Department of Fisheries

Categories News, Press ReleasesPosted on

Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, 22 February 2018 – Tuna transhipments from fishing vessels to refrigerated carrier vessels is a daily occurrence in Majuro port and represent a vital element of the Pacific tuna fishery and the ongoing Monitoring, Control, and Surveillance (MCS) efforts undertaken by Pacific Island countries.

Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority (MIMRA) officials, along with their NZMFAT Offshore Fisheries Advisor, were in Bangkok, Thailand this week to attend the 6th Global Fisheries Enforcement Training Workshop (GFETW)* from 18 – 22 February 2019.

Along the margins, the team took the opportunity to hold brief bilateral discussions with the Thailand Department of Fisheries on issues of mutual interest, namely, the signing of a fisheries cooperation Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

The MoU, signed on 22 February, is the result of a year-long engagement between the 2 countries whereby both sides identified that reciprocal exchange of fisheries data was an area of critical importance that would require mutual collaboration between key players, in this case, RMI (Majuro) being arguably the busiest transhipment port in the world and Thailand (Bangkok) as the largest tuna receiving/processing port.

With the signing of the MoU, the RMI, through MIMRA, will now be able to receive verified weights of tuna catches that are transhipped in Majuro and offloaded in Bangkok from Thai fisheries inspection officers on a regular basis.

In essence, this will enable officers on both sides to trace the catch both ways to ensure its legality throughout the entire chain of custody thereby preventing Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing practices. This verified information is vital to further understand the magnitude of the catch underreporting problem in the region.

MIMRA will provide relevant transhipment data to Thailand’s Department of Fisheries including estimation of volumes transhipped in Majuro port along with departure clearance of carrier vessels with full traceability of catch on board and hatch plan totals – information that Thailand has otherwise been unable to collect from Coastal States whose EEZs the catch is taken and in this case the port of Majuro where a large volume of the tuna that ends up in Bangkok is transhipped from purse seine fishing vessels onto carrier vessels.

The MoU is in line with the RMI IUU-Free Pacific initiative as declared by H.E. Madam President Dr. Hilda C. Heine last year. Having this direct link of collaboration with a key player like Thailand further facilitates the fulfilment of obligations under the FAO Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), which the RMI, through MIMRA, is currently considering signing and ratifying in the near future.

*The GFETW is a biennial or triennial conference organized by the International Fisheries Monitoring Control and Survelliance (MCS) Network to improve and enhance capacity and communications of MCS practitioners around the world. Sustainable fisheries can only be achieved when fishing is pursued in compliance with the applicable rules, and therefore all fishing activities in the world’s oceans and seas should be subject to adequate levels of monitoring, surveillance, inspection and enforcement.

MEDIA RELEASE: FFA wins global Stop IUU Fishing prize

Categories News, Press ReleasesPosted on

BANGKOK 22 February 2019 – The Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) was awarded the top prize in the 2019 Stop Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing competition yesterday.

“This achievement recognises FFA’s work in Monitoring, Control and Surveillance initiatives to deter IUU fishing in the Pacific. Well done to the team at FFA, past and present, and all of our FFA member countries. And the award is particularly timely given FFA has just kicked off our 40th anniversary celebrations,” said FFA Director General, Dr Manumatavai Tupou-Roosen.

“This award is a reflection of the work we do to protect the rights of FFA members over the tuna within our Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs), and the foundation of the economic and social benefits that flow from that. We have to ensure that there is long term sustainability of oceanic fish stocks to secure our peoples’ future livelihoods and regional food security.”

A panel of judges used a range of key criteria including demonstrated success and innovation in reducing IUU, the feasibility and cost of IUU mitigation activities, the potential for replication and approaches to education and capacity building.

“In preparing our submission for the award, the FFA Secretariat felt we were well able to demonstrate high level performance against all the criteria” said Dr Tupou-Roosen. “Our integrated approaches to combatting IUU are coordinated through the Regional Fisheries Surveillance Centre at FFA and encapsulated in our Regional Fisheries Monitoring, Control and Surveillance Strategy.”

“The underpinning theme of FFA and the IUU strategy is our regional cooperation. That is our Pacific way and it is the only way we are going to ensure a successful, safe, secure and prosperous future for our region,” said Dr Tupou-Roosen.

The bi-annual competition is run by the Global Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) Network and was announced at its meeting in Bangkok, Thailand.

While receiving the prize on behalf of FFA, the Acting Director for Fisheries Operations, Mr Allan Rahari, extended his thanks to the judges for their confidence in FFA, as well as the hard work and commitment of the FFA Secretariat’s current and former staff, and the Member countries. The FFA video that was part of the Agency’s submission for the award can be viewed below.


About Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA)
FFA was established to help its 17 member countries sustainably manage their fishery resources that fall within their 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). FFA is an advisory body providing expertise, technical assistance and other support to its members who make sovereign decisions about their tuna resources and participate in regional decision making on tuna management through agencies such as the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC). www.ffa.int Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

FFA was established to help its 17 member countries sustainably manage their fishery resources that fall within their 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). FFA is an advisory body providing expertise, technical assistance and other support to its members who make sovereign decisions about their tuna resources and participate in regional decision making on tuna management through agencies such as the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC). www.ffa.int Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

#Ourfishourfuture #tuna #forumfisheries #fisheries2019 #ourmoanaourfish #FFA40th

Palau Senate wants to delay marine sanctuary implementation

Categories News, NewsPosted on

Palau President Tommy Remengesau Jr. is not shutting down the request from the Japanese government to allow small scale fishermen from Okinawa to fish in Palau’s waters even after the implementation of the Palau National Marine Sanctuary (PNMS) beyond 2020.

However, Remengesau said fishing should occur in the Domestic Fishing Zone which encompasses 85,896 square miles of the country’s  Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) with 80 percent of the EEZ a “no-take zone.”

“We are not going to compromise the integrity of the PNMS,” He said.  “We are however mindful of the 20 per cent domestic fishing zone, which is a big area.”

Japan is one of Palau’s closest ally with  millions of aid provided to the country to build roads,  infrastructure and  recently a new patrol boat to help police Palau’s EEZ.

Japan has also  pledged support for Palau’s hosting of the Our Oceans Conference in 2020.

Under the PNMS law, a dedicated 20 per cent of the EEZ will be accessible to domestic fishing fleets. But the domestic fishing zone will be reserved for local fishermen and will prohibit exports. The law also required that any fish caught in the domestic fishing zone should be offloaded in Palau. 

Currently, the fishermen from Okinawa conduct fishing outside the 20 per cent Domestic Fishing Zone. 

However, Remengesau is keen to accommodate the fishermen alluding to the possibility of amendments to the PNMS law specifically about the provision that requires that all catches should be offloaded in Palau.  

“It’s about the livelihood of their people, its not a commercial operation; the question is can we do a win win situation? I think we can,” he told reporters. Japan also has the backing of the Senate which recently passed a joint resolution supporting  the wishes of the small-scale fishermen . 

(Photo: Richard W. Brooks)

Senate Joint Resolution 10-45 supports the Government of Japan’s request to allow vessels to continue its commercial fishing operation.

The Senate Committee on Resources, Commerce, Trade and Development stated in its report that Japan has assisted Palau in various infrastructure development and capacity building and that it should “reciprocate” by allowing some “fishing rights.” 

There is also a move from the Palau Senate to  delay Remengesau’s signature policy.   Sen. Frank Kyota, chair of the Senate Committee said  in an interview that his panel and several other senators will endorse the bill that seeks a delay of the PNMS implementation to 2025 instead of 2020

Kyota said extending the wind-down period would allow the country to recover from the tourism slump and increase revenues from the Pristine Paradise Environmental Fee (PPEF).  The fee is collected from visitors to Palau. 

A portion of the fee would go to the PNMS fund to support the implementation of the law.

But despite the tourism slowdown, Remengesau said it would hardly affect revenues it collects from foreign fishing licenses.

Remengesau said revenues that will be earned from the PPEF and the benefits to Palau from the Parties of Nauru Agreement’s (PNA) Vessel Day Scheme (VDS) are bigger than the income it could earn from licensing of commercial fishing in Palau.

“So it’s not so much an emergency impact if there will be no fishing because the money we receive from licensing  is a small amount compared to what we get from PPEF and also from what we receive from PNA,” Remengesau told reporters at apress conference .  

Based on the Ministry of Finance Financial report for the fourth quarter of 2018, Palau earned $8.4 million from fishing days under the PNA’s VDS while it earned only $767,417 from fish exports. Revenues collected from PPEF amounted to  $1,034,775.

 Enacted in October 2015, the law set aside 500,000 square kilometers or 80 per cent of its maritime waters for full protection with the rest set aside as domestic fishing zone.

With less than a year before it is implemented, the President vowed to reject  any attempt to delay the policy. 

However, Kyota said the Senate wants to pass the bill to generate discussions on how the tourism numbers will impact the PNMS funding mechanism.

Kyota said the Senate is not  “destroying the PNMS,”  with their push to delay the implementation but extending the wind-down period to give Palau time to recover from the tourism slump.

He noted that although he expects that the President will reject the bill, the Senate wants to be on record that it has tried to save the PNMS from losing revenues due to the tourism slowdown.

In a January 11 letter to the Natural Resources, Environment and Tourism Minister, Umiich Sengebau, Kyota’s committee raised concerns that revenues from the VDS will decrease as well when the PNMS is fully implemented.

 The committee said “since our economic frailty is an urgent matter,” the Senate needs to act on the proposed bill expeditiously.

 Sengebau in response to the committee’s concerns said there are locally-based fishing companies that are looking into the options of maintaining operations beyond the full implementation of the PNMS, such as fishing outside of Palau’s waters or at the high seas and offloading their catch here. 

The Minister also clarified that Palau can continue to earn money from the VDS through directly selling its vessel days directly to companies and any surplus days can be traded to another PNA member country.

The VDS sets an overall Total Allowable Effort (TAE) limit on the number of days fishing vessels can be licensed to fish in PNA Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) per year. Each country is allocated a share of the TAE for use in its zone each year.

These VDS days can be traded between countries in cases where a country has used up all its days while another has spare days.

The minimum benchmark for a vessel day fee for purse seiners is at $8,000.  

PRESS RELEASE: FFA Director General makes first official visit to RMI

Categories News, Press ReleasesPosted on

* Meets with President Hilda C Heine

* Backs IUU FREE Pacific campaign

* Signs MoU with Govt on Aerial Surveillance Programme (ASP)

* Signs MoU with PNAO

Dr Manu Tupou-Roosen with PNG participants of NTIS exercise. Credit: Pacific Guardians

MAJURO, 12 February 2019 – Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency Director General, Dr. Manu Tupou-Roosen has made her first official visit to the Republic of the Marshall Islands, meeting last week with Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI) President, Her Excellency, Dr Hilda C. Heine and Cabinet ministers.

During her meeting with President Heine and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Hon. John M. Silk, Dr Tupou-Roosen discussed FFA’s vision and offered the FFA’s full support for the campaign against Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing being led by RMI. She also highlighted FFA”s 40th anniversary plans.

“The meeting was a valuable opportunity to discuss ways in which FFA and RMI can collaborate to combat IUU fishing,” said Dr Tupou-Roosen. “We stand behind President Heine’s bold challenge for an IUU FREE Pacific by 2023. We will continue our work to combat IUU fishing with innovative tools such as the Persons of Interest project, Electronic Monitoring and Reporting work, and the enhanced capability provided through the Aerial Surveillance Programme.” They also discussed an IUU Colloquium that would be hosted by RMI later this year.

Parties to the Nauru Agreement Organisation CEO, Ludwig Kumoru and RMI Marine Resources Authority Director, Glen Joseph were also in attendance at the meeting.

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Government of Marshall Islands in support of the Aerial Surveillance Programme

In order to strengthen mechanisms to protect their fisheries resources and the need to enhance their monitoring, control and surveillance, the Minister of Natural Resources, Hon. Dennis Momotaro signed an MoU in support of FFA’s Regional Aerial Surveillance Programme with Dr. Tupou-Roosen.

“This MoU is symbolic as it is sets out clear parameters within which the aircraft assistance will operate, and is the platform for ensuring efficient delivery of services for RMI,” said Dr. Tupou-Roosen

“This is a landmark achievement as it will complement the existing monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) framework and strongly contribute towards achieving the 2023 IUU free Pacific Challenge laid down by H.E. President Hilda Heine.”

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) agreement with the PNAO

The visit also coincided with the signing of a historic Memorandum of Understanding between the FFA and the PNAO.

Dr. Tupou- Roosen and Mr Kumoru agreed to work closely together in supporting Members in progressing issues of common interest such as ensuring the effective management of the longline fishery and improved labour conditions on fishing vessels.

“This MoU will not only formalise and bolster our organisations relationship but will specifically move forward the directives from Members including RMI President Heine’s 2023 IUU FREE Pacific challenge,” said Dr Tupou-Roosen.

“Our vision is to make a positive difference on the livelihoods of Pacific people. None of our goals will occur without solidarity and cooperation,” she said.

“Cooperation is the cornerstone of our success in the Pacific and we will work together to overcome development challenges.”

Further information: Donna Hoerder, FFA Media, donna.hoerder@ffa.int, ph: +679 9265518

About Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA)

FFA was established to help its 17 member countries sustainably manage their fishery resources that fall within their 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). FFA is an advisory body providing expertise, technical assistance and other support to its members who make sovereign decisions about their tuna resources and participate in regional decision making on tuna management through agencies such as the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC). www.ffa.int Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

#Ourfishourfuture #tuna #forumfisheries #fisheries2019 #ourmoanaourfish

Safety of Pacific fisheries observers must be improved – PNA

Categories News, NewsPosted on

Republished from Radio New Zealand, 1 February 2019

The head of the Parties to Nauru Agreement says the safety of Pacific fisheries observers working on foreign vessels must be improved.

Fisheries observers monitor tuna catches onboard purse seiners as well as in-port trans-shipment, which provides important data for fisheries managers. Credit: Hilary Hosia

Over the past year a number of observers have been lost at sea and Ludwig Kumoru said more needed to be done to keep them safe.

Mr Kumoru said industry leaders agreed at a recent meeting to look at protecting observers and crews better.

“For the PNA, we have lost a couple of observers – PNG, Kiribati. One thing that we have done now under FFA is to push this thing for observer safe – what is the responsibility of the fishing boats when it comes to the welfare of the observer.

“When they are on the boat or when they get off – the countries. What is their responsibility to the observer? How are they going to be paid if something goes wrong with these observers.”

Last year East Sepik Governor Allan Bird told the Papua New Guinea Parliament that 18 local observers had disappeared at sea without a trace.

He called on the government to look into the cases because the men’s families deserved to know what happened to their loved ones.