Successful outcomes at Tuna Summit

Categories @WCPFC15Posted on

Tonga and other Pacific nations have succeeded in their push to persuade the Tuna Commission to start the process of rebuilding stocks of South Pacific albacore tuna – the most important tuna for Tonga.

The Pacific tuna industry has been hit hard in recent years as more foreign fishing vessels started fishing for albacore.

“It is really pleasing to me because we ended up agreeing on the Target Reference Point for albacore,” Tonga’s Minister of Fisheries Semisi Fakahau said of the outcome of the meeting.

Stocks of albacore are down to 52 per cent of their pre-fishing levels. The Tuna Commission agreed to aim to rebuild them to an interim target reference point of 56 per cent of original stocks.

This was not the full 60 per cent sought by Tonga and other Pacific countries but Forum Fisheries Agency Director General, Dr Manumatavai Tupou-Roosen described it a milestone achievement for all of the Commission.

“The challenge going forward is for FFA members to ensure they do their own work to adopt catch limits within their own waters,” she added.

With the target reference point as a guide Dr Tupou-Roosen said it would now be possible to seriously start to manage the fishery not just as the FFA membership but as a Commission.

Pacific countries were also pleased that the Commission extended measures to protect tropical tunas for another two years.

The adoption of another FFA proposal – a ‘Resolution on Labour Standards for crew on Fishing Vessels’ was welcomed as a world first.

The FFA Director General said it is a really important moment for the Commission but, she added, “countries have a lot of work ahead to put in place National legislation and minimum regional terms and conditions for the operation of fishing vessels and crew that they allow to access FFA waters”.

The Tuna Commission agreed to more money for Small Island Developing States to attend meetings and participate in decision making. They also agreed to adopt a new measure governing the Compliance Monitoring Scheme.

“It is now fundamental to ensure that FFA members continue to effectively monitor and assess compliance of all states in the Pacific,” Dr Tupou-Roosen said.

There was also a decision on trans-shipment of fish at sea.  The decision made by this Commission to review this measure next year. The FFA Director General believes that it is a critical issue because there is a need to better regulate these interactions which take place out of sight in international waters.

She said there were short falls of information in that area particularly for the longline fleet and that is one thing they will seek to address next year.

Dr Tupou-Roosen said FFA members will continue to find ways to improve fisheries management, to combat IUU fishing and the look at ways to allocate catch and effort.

Next year’s Tuna Commission meeting will be held in Papua New Guinea.

 

…..ENDS

Japan does not support US big-eye proposal at Tuna Commission

Categories @WCPFC15, News, NewsPosted on

Japan believes that the US proposal to increase its bigeye catch limit is not fair.

The proposal would reward countries for better than minimum observer coverage on their longline vessels and for banning transshipment of fish. Transshipment is well-known as a key risk area for misreporting on fish catches and for potentially other illicit activities such as trafficking people or drugs.

FFA Members including Tonga have expressed strong concerns regarding the US proposal.

Head of Japan’s delegation to the Tuna Commission in Honolulu Mr Shingo Ota told Pacific Editors Japan does not like the US proposal as there are many other factors to be taken into account.

In the case of Japan, he said, they have been providing catch support which is a fundamental basis of stock assessment, therefore this scientific contribution should be appreciated.

The view from Japan is US is picking up only limited factors which are in favour of their operations and it is unfair. The United States has acknowledged it will be the only country eligible to benefit.

Ota also denied suggestions made in the US proposal that observer coverage on the Japanese fleet has gone down in the past year. He said the US figures are misleading and wrong. Ota emphasised that Japan is actually implementing its requirement for a minimum of 5% coverage.

He said while some of the fleets had little bit less than 5%, others had more than 5%.

On observers, Japan said it had had some unfortunate incidents in the past. Sometimes observers get depressed and they really want to return to port. Therefore, the fishing vessel had to quit fishing operations. Ota said Japan is working on this issue and that’s why electronic monitoring would be one of the solutions.

Pacific countries have proposed that this year’s Tuna Commission pass a resolution in supporting better working conditions for crew and observers working in the tuna fleets of all member countries.

Ina letter to the Commission the FFA Chair, Tepaeru Herrmann said: “The issue of poor labour conditions and mistreatment of workers on fishing vessels is vitally important, both to the Pacific and across the globe. Not only is the reputation of the WCPO fishery threatened by this, but our own citizens are at risk of being subjected to deplorable working conditions,”.

Ota said while Japan was very much supportive of the idea it the questioned if the Tuna Commission is best placed to handle this issue.

“The International Labor Organisation has a convention which deals with exactly the same topic so I think it would be natural to ask the members to ratify the Convention rather than discussing this issue at WCPFC,” Ota said

Japan fears the resolution, which is non-binding, might lead on to a push for binding labour standards.

It is easier to accept if it is a non-binding resolution, but what comes next is the question,”  Ota said. ……ENDS

Tuna industry body supports Tongan fishing industry

Categories @WCPFC15, News, NewsPosted on

The Pacific Islands Tuna Industry Association (PITIA) stood up for the struggling Tongan fishing industry today when it urged the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC15) to make a decision on Target Reference Point and a Harvest Control Rule for Southern Albacore tuna.

The most recent assessment of fish numbers in the southern albacore found albacore is not over fished or experiencing over fishing.

But Executive Officer of PITIA, John Maefiti told commission members, including the powerful fishing nations, that nobody can deny the perilous state of this fishery. 

Maefiti said catch rates simply cannot support current costs, leaving many companies on the brink of financial failure.

Maefiti expressed a deep concern for their member countries over the continuous failure of the Tuna Commission in its mandate to respond effectively to dire conditions in the South Pacific Albacore fishery.

PITIA strongly encouraged WCPFC 15 to come to agreement on the harvest strategy elements that WCPFC committed to in its Harvest Strategy Workplan in 2014.

He said it is fortunate that the Southern Pacific Albacore is biologically healthy, but the key to economic viability of a fishery is the catch per unit of effort. PITIA has observed a continually declining catch per unit effort over several years, diminishing what was once a robust and attractive fishery to a shadow of itself.

PITIA told delegates that the inability of the WCPFC to control a massive increase in High Seas fishing effort is a sad indictment about the Commission’s ability to manage the fisheries under its charge. According to Maefiti, WCPFC must take heed of the Management advice and implications contained in recommendations from the Commission’s recent Scientific Committee meeting.

The PITIA told the Commission Southern Pacific albacore is a critical fishery for the Pacific nations, their fishing industry,their communities, their people and their livelihoods and well-being.

The call by PITIA for WCPFC to make a decision in its Honolulu meeting to ensure the long-term commercial viability and sustainability of the southern longline fishery was also emphasised by Tonga’s Fisheries Minister.

Honourable Semisi Fakahau in his statement delivered yesterday made a call for WCPFC to agree at this meeting for a stronger and more effective fisheries management arrangements for migratory tuna stocks and other species as Tonga wants to see an adoption of the Target Reference Point for South Pacific Albacore in Honolulu……..ENDS

Tonga pushes hard on its priorities at Tuna Commission meeting

Categories @WCPFC15, News, NewsPosted on

Honolulu… It is Tonga’s sincerest wish that the Pacific tuna fishery remains sustainable The Hon. Minister of Fisheries Semisi Fakahau told the opening session of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission in Honolulu yesterday.

Tonga’s priorities include important commercial species of tuna including albacore, bigeye yellowfin and skipjack.

Fakahau told the Commission the recent drop in catch rates in the albacore fishery in Tonga’s national waters has hampered the local fishing industry, affecting exports and the amount of fish available for local consumption.

The Minister emphasised that in order to maintain the long-term sustainability and economic viability of the tuna fisheries in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean, and to secure livelihoods for local fisherman, it is important that stronger and more effective fisheries management arrangements for migratory tuna and other species are agreed at the Honolulu meeting.

He highlighted priorities and issues that are important in the overall sustainable management of national and regional tuna fisheries. They include establishing of Target Reference Point for South Pacific Albacore, Management of the High Seas Fisheries and strengthening the Compliance Monitoring Scheme.

“South Pacific albacore is the most important target species for many island countries in the region, including Tonga. While the overall stock status is healthy, catch rates of the portion of the stock harvested by longline fishing is being reduced due to excessive fishing effort. This is severely undermining the viability of Pacific Island countries’ domestic tuna longline fishing fleets,” he said.

A target reference point refers to the ideal size of the stock fisheries managers would like to achieve. Once a target reference point has been decided more rules can be added to the management regime to ensure stocks do not fall too far below that level.

Last year the Central and Western Pacific Fisheries Commission failed to set a target reference point for albacore, despite its being under discussion since 2012.

After last year’s failed talks the Commission promised it would set a TRP for albacore this year.

Fakahau said Tonga would like to work collaboratively with all members of the Commission, including fishing partners, to adopt a Target Reference Point for South Pacific Albacore during this week’s meeting, and to advance the progress on management of this fishery for the benefit of all members as he further elaborates more on other priorities for Tonga.

“The commitment at WCPFC 14 to establish hard limits for catch and effort on the high seas, and framework for allocation of those limits between WCPFC CCMs in CMM 2017-01, is a step forward in improving management of fishing on the high seas,” said the Minister. “This has been a priority of FFA members for a number of years. We continue to support current and future work to implement this commitment”.

Fakahau thanked everyone at the WCPFC 15 who has either led or participated in the hard work and effort put in to progressing the development of a new Compliance Monitoring Scheme measure for the Commission’s consideration.

“Tonga continues to support the view of FFA member countries, on the need to ensure that the scheme is effective, efficient, and with fair implementation procedures. A new scheme must produce fair outcomes for CCMs as well as promote and improve compliance. It is also vital that the processes and tools supporting the Scheme recognise the special requirement of SIDS. This includes by streaming processes, strengthening capacity and requiring a widely consulted and well informed 2013-06 SIDS impact assessment before a measure is adopted and used in the CMS”.

On the Tropical Tuna Measure Fakahau said Tonga supports FFA members’ position to retain bigeye longline catch limits, to retain current purse seine effort limits on high seas and to retain additional high seas FAD closure.

Fakahau concluded his statement with a commitment to continue to work together with all parties to address these issues during this Commission’s meeting.

Tuna nations bid to climate-proof EEZs

Categories @WCPFC15, News, NewsPosted on

Honolulu… And other initiatives designed to help Pacific countries sustain their fisheries

The eight tuna rich nations in the PNA group are looking into ways of maintaining the current size of their valuable 200-mile exclusive economic zones even if sea-level rise means they lose land to rising sea levels brought on by climate change.

 “This is one of the most important things the PNA is going to start looking at,” PNA CEO Ludwig Kumoru said when briefing Pacific Editors on issues which may arise at the 15thWestern and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission in Honolulu.

PNA’s CEO Ludwig Kumora briefs journalists in Honolulu this week (Photo: Jemima Garrett)

The aim of the PNA initiative is to find a way to set permanent boundaries to EEZs now so that in 50 or 100 years’ time, if people have to migrate to other countries due to sea-level rise, they will still be able to benefit from the economic resources such as tuna within their EEZ’s.

“We want to make sure that even if their land disappears that they don’t lose their EEZ,” he said

Mr Kumoru said the PNA action could indirectly assist non-member Pacific countries.

And he said the PNA will continue to support issues outside of but related to fisheries, including damage to the environment, the impact of climate change on the ocean and tuna stocks and human and drug trafficking that could be associated with fishing.

PNA – or Parties to the Nauru Agreement –  is a grouping set up to cooperate to manage fisheries of common interest, particularly skipjack, yellowfin and bigeye tuna which are predominantly found in waters to the north of Tonga. The PNA is made up of the Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu plus Tokelau.

Kumoru said these issues impacted PNA members and non-member countries alike and must be addressed to ensure ongoing improvement and expansion of sustainable fisheries management and commercial opportunities in the Pacific.

He noted consumers of tuna had become more environmentally conscious and want companies supplying their food to be socially accountable.

Kumoru said the PNA is pushing for improved treatment of  tuna workers and greater product information for consumers.

The PNA would take responsibility for the environment because it recognised that declining fish stocks was due to a number of issues including the health of the ocean.

Greater regional cooperation by the PNA, Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) and Pacific Community (SPC) on the common issue of sea level rise was necessary to protect countries which could lose land through coastal erosion, Kumoru said.

On new membership to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC), Kumoru said the PNA was opposed to admitting more countries as full member, pointing out that cooperating non-members and observers could still be active participants in the work of the Commission.

WCPFC which meets in Honolulu this week sets the fishing rules in the Western and Central Pacific. It is made up of Pacific countries and Distant Water Fishing Nations such as the United States of America, China and Taiwan.

Kumoru said the current tropical tuna measure approved by the WCPFC a year ago was a well-balanced measure that should be extended and the PNA supported the stance that the existing measure should not be weakened in any way.

This stand would ensure sustainability of tuna stocks.

 Meanwhile, Chief Executive Officer of Fisheries Dr Tu’ikolongahau Halafihi told Radio Tonga News that his country supports activities implemented to safeguard the livelihood of this major regional source of income.

Halafihi said Tonga was aware of the importance to keep its ocean clean.

Honourable Minister of Fisheries Semisi Fakahau is leading Tonga’s delegation to the WCPFC 15th Convention in Honolulu ……ENDS

Pacific disappointed as Tuna Commission talks on albacore fail

Categories @WCPFC13, FFA Media Fellows Past EventsPosted on

By Viola Ulakai – Tonga Broadcasting Commission

DENARAU, NADI — As the Tuna Commission enters its final day of discussions in Nadi the Forum fisheries agency has expressed deep disappointment about the outcome on albacore tuna – the species most important to Tonga.

Albacore tuna stocks have dropped to a level which makes it uneconomic for the local industry to fish.

Foreign boats, especially those from China that receive fuel subsidies that the Pacific boats do not get, are still viable.

For the past decade these boats have been driving the Pacific fleet out of business.

Tonga and other FFA countries asked the Tuna Commission to set a target catch for albacore as the first step towards a harvest strategy that would put the fishery back on an economically sustainable footing.

Speaking to journalists last night the Deputy Director of the FFA Wez Norris described discussion on albacore as ‘very disappointing’.

“It seems very clear that there’s no support from the commission as a whole to move towards this,” he said.

China and Taiwan in particular had concerns about the Pacific countries proposals.

“We are very frustrated about this,” Mr Norris said.

But the Pacific will continue with its own plans to put the fishery on a better footing using the pact known as the Tokelau arrangement, to which Tonga is member.

If there is no resolution of differences on albacore on the last day of the Commission Mr Norris said Pacific countries will continue with their plans to set appropriate fishing limits for the waters of the Tokelau Arrangement Parties’ and work on a catch management arrangements.

The aim of this is for the Pacific countries to come together to exert more control on the fishery.

However, Mr Norris said it is a problematic situation as a lot of catch and fishing effort for albacore takes place in the high seas where the Pacific does not have control.

Tonga’s Director of Fisheries Dr Tu’ikolongahau Halafihi reinforced the statement made by the FFA Deputy Director General.

He said albacore is a stock that requires management by the WCPFC – the only body that has the power to make to set fishing rules in the high seas.

Editor’s Note: The Commission ended with no more progress on albacore

Members of the Tokelau arrangement include: Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, New Zealand, Niue, PNG, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga and Vanuatu

Pacific disappointed as Tuna Commission talks on albacore fail

Categories @WCPFC13, FFA Media Fellows Past EventsPosted on

By Viola Ulakai, Pacific Media@WCPFC13

As the tuna Commission enters its final day of discussions in Nadi the Forum fisheries agency has expressed deep disappointment about the outcome on albacore tuna – the species most important to Tonga.
Albacore tuna stocks have dropped to a level which makes it uneconomic for the local industry to fish.
Foreign boats, especially those from China that receive fuel subsidies that the Pacific boats do not get, are still viable.
For the past decade they have been driving the Pacific fleet out of business.
Tonga and other FFA countries asked the Tuna Commission to set a target catch for albacore as the first step towards a harvest strategy that would put the fishery back on an economically sustainable footing.
Speaking to journalists last night the Deputy Director of the FFA Wez Norris described discussion on albacore as ‘very disappointing’.
“It seems very clear that there’s no support from the commission as a whole to move towards this,” he said.

China and Taiwan in particular had concerns about the Pacific countries proposals.

“We are very frustrated about this,” Mr Norris said.

But the Pacific will continue with its own plans to put the fishery on a better footing using the pact known as the Tokelau arrangement, to which Tonga is member.

If there is no resolution of differences on albacore on the last day of the Commission Mr Norris said Pacific countries will continue with their plans to set appropriate fishing limits for the waters of the Tokelau Arrangement Parties’ and work on a catch management arrangements.
The aim of this is for the Pacific countries to come together to exert more control on the fishery.
However, Mr Norris said it is a problematic situation as a lot of catch and fishing effort for albacore takes place in the high seas where the Pacific does not have control.
Tonga’s Director of Fisheries Dr Tu’ikolongahau Halafihi reinforced the statement made by the FFA Deputy Director General.
He said albacore is a stock that requires management by the WCPFC – the only body that has the power to make to set fishing rules in the high seas.
Mr Norris said the Pacific countries are also disappointed about lack of progress with talks to improve safety conditions for people who work as independent observers on fishing boats but that other issues of importance for the region were progressing quite nicely.

The FFA is pleased with discussions on a timeframe for rebuilding bigeye tuna stocks.
Bigeye is over fished and there’s a need to set a target for when to solve it.
Mr Norris said the text on bigeye hasn’t been formally adopted yet but there seemed to be pretty good agreement around the table that the Tuna commission will implement a ten-year time frame.
It is quite complex because you have got a huge number of countries sitting around the table and they all have slightly different interests, or markedly different interests,” Mr Norris said.
As a result coming up with a list of objectives that adequately covers the concerns of all countries is quite a long process, he said.

Tonga’s fishing industry gets regional profile

Categories @WCPFC13, FFA Media Fellows Past EventsPosted on

By Viola Ulakai,  Pacific Media@WCPFC13

 

The challenges faced by Tonga’s fishing industry will get a higher profile aft as a result of the relaunch of the Pacific Tuna Industry Association’s website this week in Nadi

 

The relaunching was held as one of the side events associated with the 13th session of the Western and Central Pacific Commission (WCPFC).

 

PITIA is a regional body for national fisheries associations in the Pacific Island Countries except Australia, New Zealand and Tokelau.

 

The Secretariat of the Pacific Islands Tuna Industry, PITIA was located in Nuku’alofa before its Executive Board’s decision to relocated it to Honiara late last year.

 

At the launching event, chairman of PITIA Mr Frank Wickham said there are many challenges that domestic companies are facing in the fishing industry and there is a belief that tools such as the website and the media engagement and partnerships will help their members.

 

Commercial fishing of tuna is the primary focus of PITIA. It also represents its members’ commercial interest at policy making forums of their respective Governments.

 

The representation of the interest of the industry is crucial to both the economic sustainability of the domestic industry as well as the enhancing of compliance of such policies.

 

PITIA has achieved observer status at several crucial policy forums and is the recognized industry representative to Forum Fisheries Committee meeting.

 

According to PITIA promotion of sustainable fishing behaviour, which adds value to the economy is another important role for PITIA.

 

The Pacific tuna industry, including the industry in Tonga, is facific some serious challenges.

 

Complaints recently raised in Tonga’s Parliament revealed local fishing vessels have to compete with larger Asian heavily-subsided fishing vessels which are more efficient.

 

High port fees and other related costs, the imposing of consumption tax on fishing primary industry product plus others are also holding the Tongan fishing industry back according to the National Fisheries Association.

 

In an earlier interview with Radio Tonga News during the 13th WCPFC this week, the Hon Minister of Fisheries Semisi Fakahau said the government has done a trial exercise aiming to bring down the cost of fish in the local market.

 

He said the local fishing companies and foreign registered vessels have agreed to off-load to the local market 5 tons from each trip in a very low price.

 

During the re-launching of the PITIA website, the Environmental Development Fund (EDF) senior manager Sarah O’Brian congratulated PITIA on the initiative saying she hoped the website would give the industry association a stronger voice and help it achieve its goals.

 

PITIA CEO John Maefiti in thanking EDF for funding the relaunching of the website told the gathering that when people want to buy fish from the Pacific Ocean they send their orders to Thailand, Japan and the Philippines, when they should send their orders to the Pacific Islands where the tuna comes from.

Contact details of the companies that are operating in the Pacific will be available on the website so now when people want to order tuna, they can just go online and buy a Pacific product.

Glimmer of hope as tuna negotiations enter their fourth day

Categories @WCPFC13, FFA Media Fellows Past EventsPosted on

There is a level of optimism that this year’s Tuna Commission will make some small progress on issues of importance to the Pacific.

The Director General of the Forum Fisheries Agency James Movick and his PNA counterpart Ludwig Kumoru told a media briefing that even though it is still early in the talks there are signs of a better outcome than last year.

The WCPFC is responsible for setting the fishing rules in the world’s biggest fishery but because it includes fishing powers as well as Pacific nations it has been hard to make progress.

Mr Movick said this year the tone of discussions has not been so negative or pessimistic and he sees progress on small but important issues such as risk management in setting catch targets.

Tonga’s Director of Fisheries, Dr Tu’ikolongahau Halafihi told Radio Tonga News in Nadi that arguments always happen especially when the parties do not agree on issues such as management measures to be imposed on the fishing industry.

Dr Halafihi said big distance water fishing countries are insisting on their agenda in-terms of their fishing activities while small groups are pushing their own needs and what is required from big countries.

For him there are very sensitive issues and although he does not really expect that they will achieve much but it’s an opportunity for member countries of the Tuna Commission to conduct more dialogue on those issues.

Dr Halafihi explained that Tonga in some cases has to meet limits on its annual catch of about 2,500 tons.

Tonga has not been able to achieve this limit, Dr Halafihi said, so it shows something needs to be done.

That’s why Tonga got involved on the Tokelau Arrangement, working on preserving Albacore and ensuring of sustainable fishing practices.

Meanwhile the FFA Director-General said officials in the working groups seemed to think that they will get a good draft on the important issue of risk management in setting catch targets.

The WCPFC also took an important step in trying to find a solution for continuing overfishing on severely depleted Pacific Bluefin which is now down to just 2.6 per cent or its pre-fishing stocks.

The meeting in Nadi took the unusual step or ordering the Northern Committee which makes recommendations on Bluefin to go back and try harder to find a solution to the Bluefin dilemma.

Mr Movick said until now the fishing nations involved in the northern committee have been very resistant to improving Bluefin management bringing the whole WCPFC into disrepute.

As Bluefin is not found in Pacific Island waters it is something that the Pacific Islands Party has no role in it but Mr Movick said it is a very encouraging sign that as a result the very frank and open discussion the northern committee has been asked to reconvene.

One of the big issues for the Pacific is achieving a new tropical tuna measure for skipjack, yellowfin and bigeye tuna at next year’s meeting.

For this to be a success t incremental steps are needed this year.

Mr Movick said although on Tuesday negotiations looked a bit rocky they now seem to be holding on to a course compatible with the fundamental fisheries interests of Pacific countries.

Pacific proposal for World Tuna Day gets UN backing

Categories @WCPFC13, FFA Media Fellows Past EventsPosted on

Viola Ulukai, Pacific Media@WCPFC13

The United Nations General Assembly has unanimously declared May second each year as World Tuna Day.
The proposal was initiated by Nauru on behalf of all UN SIDS, and went to the UN with the backing of all 17 Pacific Island members of the Forum Fisheries Agency including Tonga, and follows on from almost a decade of PNA hosting its own World Tuna Day every May 2.
“We are delighted with United Nations ratification of World Tuna Day,” said PNA CEO Ludwig Kumoru, who is in Fiji attending the 13th annual meeting of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC).
His comments were echoed by the FFA director general James Movick.
“It’s great news and could not have come at a better time for all the Pacific SIDS Mr Movick said

“I understand the resolution was co-sponsored by 96 countries from all regions, coastal, island and landlocked, demonstrating the hard work led by Nauru in securing truly global support for World Tuna Day, and adding to the goodwill behind the unanimous vote in the general assembly,” said Mr Movick.

Mr Kumoru of PNA said the United Nations’ decision on Tuna World Day confirms the world’s appreciation of tuna.
According to Mr Kumoru the adoption of the International Day for Tuna helps emphasize the importance of its conservation management outcomes that the annual meeting of WCPFC this week is trying to achieve.
These objectives include developing harvesting control strategies and management measures. . He said the next step for the PNA is rolling out increased management of the longline fishery.
A statement from the FFA said the resolution notes that many countries depend heavily on tuna resources for food security and nutrition, economic development, employment, government revenue, livelihoods, and culture and recreation.

It also recognized the importance of sustainably managed stocks in achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.